CALL US THIS MORNING FOR SERVICE TODAY | COUPONS
CALL US NOW: 317-860-0806
Garage in Winter

How to Keep the Weather from Seeping in? Seal Your Garage Door.

Whether it is summer thunderstorms or freezing winter air, the elements can seep into your garage and wreak havoc on items stored there. Barely noticeable small leaks can result in mold, mildew and pest infestations because they evolve over time. What’s your best defense? Sealing your garage door in three major places.        

Sealing blocks water, insects and other pests from entering your garage increases energy efficiency and blocks noise, creating a more ideal environment for storage, working or lounging. The goal is to have a cool, dry space that is free of debris and moisture. And though insulated doors are highly effective, a break in a seal could undermine their efficiency.  

Areas to Seal

Main areas that can become vulnerable over time: the space along the top, sides, and bottom of the garage door. There are a few different strategies to try to close any gaps:

Cover the space between the door and the floor. There are two different ways to do this:

  • Seal the garage door bottom
  • Place the seal on the garage floor so that the door rests on top

Line the top and sides of the door. It’s not completely flush, the space between the door and the jamb, because the door needs space to raise and lower. Weatherstriping between these two surfaces, however, smoothes the gap and adds protection.

How to Seal Your Garage Door

You’ll need a few different types of sealants:

Door bottom seal: The strip is made of vinyl or rubber, and it is tacked or fitted to an aluminum track stretching across the bottom of the door. This type of barrier blocks water, dirt and debris, animals and pests.

Threshold seal: Usually made of rubber, a threshold seal adheres to the garage floor. It’s very effective in blocking water and debris, so much so that the barrier might make sweeping out the garage challenging.

Weatherstrip: Garage door weatherstrip wedges between the doorframe and the garage door, and it is easily nailed into place.

It’s that easy to seal your garage door but to get the best results, try installing an insulated garage door. We’ve got a great selection. Contact us for a consultation!

Man installing a garage door

How to Install a Garage Door and When to Call an Expert

Changing the look of your home could be as easy as changing your garage door. And depending on the door type and features, it can be a DIY project. What does the work entail? We’ve laid out the steps below.  

Detach the door. Your old door may have specific removal instructions, per the manufacturer’s manual. But in general, you want to separate the door from the pulleys, remove each door panel and unfasten the tracks.

Be prepared for the weight. Doors made of wood, glass, and steel are heavier than the aluminum and can be cumbersome. Take care to disassemble the door in pieces, so that you aren’t holding more than you can handle.

Get the right dimensions and lay new tracks. You need to know the height and width of the door opening, of course, but overall depth and capacity above the door should also be noted–this is the fly space, providing enough room for an open door. Shoot for about 12” above the door and enough clearance to encompass its height, with at least 20” buffer.

When you install a new door, make sure to install the corresponding vertical and horizontal tracks–they’ve been designed with appropriately spaced gussets, which allow the door to open and close at specific distances. Without these pre-sets, the door can get caught along the jambs, increasing pressure and instability.   

Attach brackets and rollers. Put the framework in place, whether it be mounting brackets on the wall or door jamb and sliding the rollers onto the tracks.

Place panels and secure from the bottom up. Weatherstrip the bottom panel and level it, laying it into the door frame and securing according to manufacturer instructions. From here, attach hinges as necessary, which allow the door to fold as it rises/falls.  

Spring the door and test it. Attach the springs to the pulleys in the final step and test the door–it will probably take two or more people to hold it steady while lifting it slowly, making sure the tracks are even, parallel and smooth.

There are a lot of pieces to manage in garage door installations, not to mention the need for exactness and adequate support. For many, the project requires calling in garage door experts to do the job. Here’s why you may want to do so.

Why and when you need a professional tech to install your garage door

The process–and doors themselves– can be cumbersome. Here at Garage Doors of Indianapolis, we may send two or three techs for an installation, depending on the door type, because they can weigh up to 400 or more lbs. The doors must be secured and tracked in various positions, which calls for a degree of expertise and manpower. It’s not a one-man job.

Your safety is at risk. Do you know what could happen if you don’t use the correct/level tracks, install hinges in the wrong places or have incorrect spring tension or counterbalance? Lack of awareness of how the pieces play together could result in door falls that harm to your vehicle–or yourself.   

Lack of security. Even if the door functions properly, is it secure? Most high-tech features that customers find desirable include electrical wiring or computer programming that complicate the installation process, requiring expertise to make sure it is tamper-resistant.   

You gain warranty, service, and support. Not only is the door covered by a manufacturer warranty, most garage door companies back their product and workmanship. We offer 24 hour emergency service, annual maintenance, and regular repairs.

 

Interested in updating your garage door? Contact us to schedule a consult and/or installation.

Garage Door Half Open

How Often Should I Have My Garage Door Serviced?

You should have your garage door serviced at least once a year if no other issues arise. Service technicians prolong the life of your garage door with preventative maintenance: lubricating areas of the door, tightening bolts and screws and adjusting spring tension. Although your door may work just fine without it, annual service will prevent issues in the future.

It’s also a good idea to conduct your own monthly check. Take these things into consideration when doing an overview of your garage door:

  • Determine if the door can be opened manually from the outside without the opener
  • Check for broken glass if your door has windows
  • Listen for unusual noises, such as clicks or a whine when opening and closing the door
  • Ensure that your door is able to completely close without issues

The information you provide to service technicians can help them diagnose and fix issues faster. Following are two tests that you can conduct yourself.

The photo eye is the mechanism in your garage door that keeps your children, pets and belongings safe if they are in the way of a closing garage door. It forces the door open to prevent accidents.

Check the eye’s effectiveness using a broom or other long object — not an arm or a leg –by placing it under the door close to the ground as it closes. The door should reverse and open back up. If it does not, keep people and pets away from the door and consult a garage door specialist.

Evaluate your door’s alignment by first disconnecting the opener. (Liftmaster provides a very helpful guide for disconnecting and reconnecting your opener, so do your research to know what you are doing beforehand).

The door should rise and lower manually. If opening it requires excessive force, or does not open relatively smoothly, there may be an issue that needs to be resolved. Next, raise the garage door halfway and let go. If it moves up or down, the door is out of balance and you should call a service technician.

If all goes well, you will be able to reconnect your opener after this test, and know that your garage door is good to go!

Old Garage Door

Repair vs. Replacement: Options for Old Garage Doors

Many newly constructed homes have attached garages that can house at least two cars. But older homes – those built when a family usually had one car instead of two or three – may have only detached single-car garages (if they have garages at all).

Sometimes, old garages are so small that they have rarely been used as intended – they became storage sheds, and all the moving parts of the garage door were ignored for years. So if new owners move in and intend to park in the garage, they may need to make some repairs before that can happen.

It’s rare to find an old detached garage that’s wired for electricity, which means garage doors must be manually opened and closed, and rusted parts may make doors extremely difficult to open. Repairing or replacing the garage door can alleviate a lot of aggravation, but deciding which option is best takes some careful consideration.

Overall Costs

Replacing a garage door will be costlier than repairing a broken spring. But the components in old garage doors may deteriorate gradually, requiring repeat emergency repair costs that can really add up over time.

A garage door repair technician can tell you which repairs are necessary and urgent, and which parts will likely need to be replaced in the near future. If you don’t want to worry about parts going bad or potentially being unable to get in or out of your garage, a new door may be the best choice. With a new door installation, the entire track system is replaced, so the door operates smoothly.

Vehicle Size

A garage built in the 1920s wasn’t designed to house an SUV and a riding lawnmower, so the doors tend to be quite narrow. Provided the garage is wide enough, you may be able to reconfigure the entrance to accommodate a wider door. That project can be expensive, but it can also reduce the risk of dents and scratches on your car from bumping into a narrow door frame.

Aesthetics

Old wooden garage doors may show signs of rot or maybe warped to the extent they always look a little off-kilter. Replace decaying doors to increase your home’s curb appeal and market value.

If wooden doors seem to be in good shape but just need minor repairs, you might want to keep them, especially if their architectural style complements your home’s exterior. A new coat of paint or stain can freshen-up faded doors.

3 Reasons Your Garage Door Won’t Close

Here’s a scenario that can ruin your morning: You’re running late for work, you hop in your car, pull out of your garage, hit the button on the remote control for your garage door opener, but the door doesn’t close. You can’t leave the house with the garage door open. At the very least, you’re going to be late to work, as you try to troubleshoot the problem.

Hopefully, you’ll never find yourself in this situation. But if you do, following are some of the reasons your door might be jammed.

  1. Safety Sensor Malfunction

If the door begins to close but stops short of the ground, the problem may be your safety sensors – those gadgets at the bottom of your garage door that keep it from closing on your foot. When sensors are knocked out of alignment, or if one of the sensor eyes is dirty, the door won’t close all the way. Usually, the tiny lights on sensors are solid; if they’re blinking, you can try realigning them.

  1. Faulty Remote

If you can close the door using the wall switch, you might just have a faulty remote control. Remotes may also experience radio frequency interference that disrupts communication with the unit that opens your garage door. Even LED light bulbs near the opener can disrupt the radio signal. Try turning off lights and wireless devices in or near the garage, to test for radio frequency interference. Ultimately, you may need a new opener, or you may need to change the frequency band at which the remote and opener communicate.

  1. Limit Switch Adjustment

Garage door openers have a limit switch that controls how far the door moves when it opens or closes. If, when the door is open, you continue to hear the opener motor running and can’t close the door, that’s probably due to a limit switch problem. Essentially, the motor is running because the opener is still trying to open the door

1 2

$30 Off Any Garage Door Service Call!